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Apple filed two inter partes review (IPR) petitions challenging one patent owned by Finnegan client VirnetX, seeking to join its petitions to petitions filed by another petitioner challenging another VirnetX patent.  Based on Finnegan’s arguments in the preliminary responses, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) denied the motions for joinder and denied institution on the basis that the petitions were time-barred under 35 U.S.C. 315(b).

Finnegan secured a victory for Juniper Networks in the Northern District of California against Florida-based Juniper Media in a trademark infringement and cybersquatting law suit. Defendant moved to dismiss (or to transfer) the trademark infringement and cybersquatting case claiming lack of jurisdiction on the grounds that its website was a passive website and the majority of the company’s operations were based in Florida. Judge William Alsup ruled in Juniper Networks’ favor finding that the Defendant’s repeated representations of being located in, or having connections with, Silicon Valley in its Twitter account, its Linked In page, and its CEO’s personal web pages was sufficient to demonstrate that it expressly aimed its activities at the Northern District. The investigative efforts of our inhouse investigation team were critical to building the case for personal jurisdiction. Following Juniper Networks’ win on the jurisdictional issue, the parties ultimately reached a settlement pursuant to which Juniper Media agreed to change its name, abandon its trademark applications, and transfer its domain names to the client. The case was ultimately dismissed following the defendant’s completion of all phase-out activities.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit upheld a jury decision in the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona in favor of Finnegan client DuPont Air Products NanoMaterials, LLC (DA NanoMaterials), holding that various tungsten Chemical Mechanical Planarization (CMP) slurries sold by DA Nanomaterials do not infringe Cabot Microelectronic’s patents.  Tungsten CMP is a process used in semiconductor manufacturing.

LG Electronics received a favorable decision in a washing machine patent infringement case tried in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware. Following a four-day trial, a Delaware jury determined that three LG patents related to direct-drive front-load washing machine technology are valid and infringed by certain washing machines made by Daewoo and sold by Daewoo and its business partners in the United States.

The verdict confirms LG's innovative leadership in the direct-drive front-load washing machine field. LG’s patented technology provides consumers with large-capacity, high-spin-speed washers that produce low noise and vibration. LG's leadership and patented innovations have led to LG's No. 1 market position in U.S. sales of front-load washing machines from 2007 to the present. This trial dealt only with liability issues (validity and infringement) and the case settled soon after trial.

A jury in the U.S. District Court in Delaware found that French Door refrigerators produced by Finnegan client LG Electronics do not infringe a Whirlpool patent, but found that some patent claims covered certain earlier-generation LG side-by-side refrigerators, which LG is no longer making. The jury determined that LG was not willfully infringing these claims.  Another Whirlpool patent asserted against LG was found invalid.  Whirlpool was awarded $1.78 million for infringement of the earlier-generation side-by-side refrigerators, an amount well below Whirlpool’s quest for total damages of more than $22 million.

California-based ACTON, Inc. received funding from over 700 backers in over 40 countries through its Kickstarter campaign to start production of its smart electric RocketSkates® roller skates. This fast-moving company, whose innovative personal transportation products blend form and function through cutting-edge designs, has relied on Finnegan to protect its designs in the United States and internationally. After preparing and filing design patent applications in the United States, Finnegan has coordinated the prosecution of counterpart cases by working with its extensive network of international partners across the globe, including in European Union, China, Japan, and South Korea.

After more than a year of deliberations, Judge Dennis Saylor of the U.S. District Court for the District of Massachusetts handed a victory to firm client DeWalch Technologies, Inc. of Houston, Texas.  In the case, Inner-Tite Corp. of Holden, Mass. accused DeWalch of infringing a patent directed to a locking device for an electric utility meter box.   At trial, Finnegan presented evidence of no literal infringement and no infringement under the doctrine of equivalents.  The court found in favor of DeWalch on all counts.

When a leading patent management company wanted to generate royalties from patents developed and owned by an international group of research and operating companies, it turned to Finnegan for assistance in setting up and running a licensing and enforcement program involving a full range of activities—analyzing the patents, identifying infringers in the marketplace, negotiating and drafting license agreements, litigating to enforce the patents, and providing strategic advice throughout the process.

Finnegan represented an LG Electronics (“LGE”) subsidiary involved in iris recognition technology in a patent infringement case. The patentee accused LGE of violating a license agreement, misappropriating trade secrets, and infringing the patentee’s U.S. patents. Both sides filed antitrust and unfair competition counterclaims. The patentee also filed foreign corrupt practices act claims after losing several large foreign public tenders involving the technology to LGE. Finnegan was lead counsel on both the intellectual property (patent and trade secret) and the antitrust and unfair competition claims, and secured an extremely favorable resolution of all claims, enabling LGE to purchase the critical software and continue using the underlying technology.

Finnegan’s longstanding client LG Electronics won a major victory in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of California, which awarded more than $168 million in damages in a trademark counterfeiting case against nearly 20 companies accused of selling counterfeit and knock-off LG headsets. Although the Lanham Act gives courts broad discretion in determining the amount of statutory damages—allowing damages of anywhere from $200,000 to $2 million per mark if the counterfeiting is found to be willful—the court decided to award the statutory maximum of $2 million per mark given the strength and recognition of the LG brand and TONE™ products. Notably, the ruling has considerable teeth, as it came with a provision ordering financial payment providers to hand over funds previously frozen under the court’s preliminary injunction order.


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