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Finnegan advised an international equipment company regarding its launch of a 3D printer. This was the first traditional manufacturing company from outside the 3D printing industry to introduce a 3D printer. This soup-to-nuts project involved developing legal statements for the operating manual, creating of a software user agreement and website terms and conditions, and analyzing agreements with development partners.

Finnegan represented Roshen, a major Ukrainian candy maker, in two actions initiated by Ferrero Rocher before the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board. Ferrero claimed that the ROSHEN logos were likely to infringe and dilute its ROCHER and FERRERO ROCHER marks. Roshen counterclaimed to cancel Ferrero’s registration for the mark ROCHER on the grounds of fraud and abandonment.  Finnegan worked closely with experts to design and conduct two nationwide consumer surveys: one on the likelihood of confusion and the other testing actual association of the ROSHEN logo with FERRERO ROCHER/ROCHER for dilution. The survey results showed a less than three percent chance of potential confusion or association.  In the middle of the TTAB proceedings, Ferrero filed a federal lawsuit against Roshen in a U.S. district court, asserting trademark infringement and unfair competition, but then withdrew the complaint.  At the end of the discovery period, Ferrero withdrew both its TTAB opposition and cancellation proceedings against Roshen with prejudice, resulting in a complete victory for Roshen.

Finnegan client CRS Advanced Technologies achieved a complete win in the second decision related to covered business method (CBM) patents issued by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The Board cancelled every claim that had been pending in a related district court infringement litigation. In the CBM, Finnegan challenged the patent as not meeting the requirements of 35 U.S.C. § 101 and presented arguments in favor of claim cancellation, in what was the second such CBM hearing before the PTAB. The decision capped a decade of litigation for CRS. Frontline Technologies, Inc. initially sued CRS for patent infringement on one patent, which ultimately settled with CRS taking a patent license that Finnegan had negotiated with Frontline. Frontline later terminated the license and sued CRS a second time. The district court subsequently stayed the case pending a reexamination proceeding instituted by the USPTO on a petition filed by Finnegan on CRS's behalf, from which the patent emerged, heavily amended, two years later. Meanwhile, another Frontline patent issued and was asserted against CRS but, after a third party requested reexamination of that patent, Frontline granted CRS a covenant against suit and dropped that second patent from the litigation. The case continued for three more years on the reexamined patent, allowing Finnegan to file a CBM petition on the first day that procedure became available. The PTAB granted the petition, and a month later the district court again stayed the case, which was then in the final stages of pre-trial submissions. The Board agreed with CRS that the claims were unpatentable, and the related district court proceeding has since been dismissed with prejudice with the consent of the parties.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, in an en banc opinion, confirmed the existence of a separate written description requirement that ensures that inventors have actually invented and described the subject matter claimed in their patents. The decision reversed a jury verdict against Finnegan client Eli Lilly and Company.  Lilly had previously been found liable for infringing Ariad’s ’516 patent, and the jury had awarded Ariad a multi-million dollar verdict.  The en banc opinion held that the asserted claims of the ’516 patent failed to satisfy the written description requirement of section 112 and were thus invalid. 

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit reversed a decision by the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) that Nokia did not infringe two patents relating to 3G cellular telephone technology held by Finnegan client InterDigital. Specifically, the Federal Circuit reversed the ITC's claim construction of two key terms and remanded the case to the ITC for further proceedings. In addition, the Federal Circuit affirmed the ITC's decision that InterDigital's substantial patent licensing program satisfied the ITC's domestic industry requirement.

We represented Fanuc Robotics in patent enforcement litigation involving paint robots used in the automotive industry, settling the litigation during an appeal to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.

Following a claim construction ruling in Philips’ favor, plaintiff Luv n’ Care stipulated to a final judgment that Philips did not infringe the five asserted patents related to toddler sippy cups.  Accordingly, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas entered a judgment of noninfringement in favor of Finnegan clients Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V., Philips Electronics North America Corporation, and Avent Ltd.

Following a two-week trial, a jury in the Northern District of California returned a unanimous defense verdict in favor of Finnegan clients ABBYY USA Software House, Inc. (of Milpitas, California), ABBYY Software, Ltd. (of Nicosia, Cyprus), ABBYY Production LLC (of Moscow, Russia), and Lexmark International, Inc. (of Lexington, Kentucky). Nuance Communications, Inc., had accused the ABBYY companies of infringing two patents directed to optical character recognition (OCR) software and a third patent directed to distributed document processing over a computer network. Nuance also sued Lexmark, a former Nuance customer, after it stopped using Nuance products and began using ABBYY’s OCR software. In addition, Nuance alleged that ABBYY infringed its trade dress for software packaging used for retail and internet sales. Prior to trial, Nuance sought more than $260 million in damages from the defendants. Nuance also alleged willful infringement and sought treble damages and attorneys’ fees from the defendants. The jury rejected Nuance’s infringement allegations in their entirety, returning a verdict of no infringement for all three Nuance patents and that Nuance’s alleged trade dress was not protectable. The Federal Circuit affirmed the district court’s judgment.

The Central District of California entered judgment invalidating all claims that Lochner Technologies—a non-practicing entity—had asserted against Finnegan client Toshiba America Information Systems, Inc.  On summary judgment and before the parties engaged in costly discovery, the judge found the claims invalid for lacking a sufficient written description and for failing to claim what the inventors regarded as their invention.  The court previously issued a favorable claim construction ruling that eliminated most accused products from the case.  The invalidity ruling disposed of the remaining issues.  Initially, Lochner had asserted its patent against twenty-two defendants.  Most settled, but Toshiba and Vizio, Inc. fought until the invalidity ruling brought the district court case to a close.

A jury in the Southern District of New York found five defendants liable for infringing Finnegan clients Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. and U.S. Philips’ valid patent related to the basic structure for optical storage media devices, or CD-Discs.  Each of the defendants had signed a contract with Philips to license the pool of patents covering CD-Disc technology.  Philips filed a breach of contract and patent infringement suit against the defendants when they stopped paying royalties while continuing to manufacture discs.  The jury victory followed Philips’ successful motions for summary judgment relating to various breach of contract and patent issues.  A damages trial will follow.


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