Print PDF

You searched for: “View All”

Showing 1 - 10 of 243 results. View All

Sort By: Title | Date

Pages: << < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>


Finnegan obtained an early stay and a subsequent voluntary dismissal for Nikon Corporation and Nikon Inc. in a multi-party patent infringement suit, thus limiting Nikon's involvement in a litigation filed by Honeywell International Inc. and Honeywell Intellectual Properties, Inc.  Honeywell filed a series of suits against 30+ corporations claiming infringement of a patent directed to LCD modules.  Nikon was accused of infringement in one of the suits, even though it was not a manufacturer of the LCD modules used in its digital still cameras. Characterizing Nikon as a "customer defendant," we filed a successful motion to stay the litigation with respect to Nikon.  During the stay, Honeywell eventually settled with the defendants that were LCD suppliers for Nikon's cameras, allowing for Nikon's dismissal from the litigation based on the fact that Nikon was protected by Honeywell's settlements with Nikon's suppliers.

The Federal Circuit unanimously affirmed a district court judgment of willful infringement and a damages award of approximately $290 million, plus interest, as well as the entry of a permanent injunction against Microsoft in favor of Finnegan client i4i, a Canadian software company that developed tools for working with documents containing XML markup.  The court held that Microsoft had waived certain arguments by not properly objecting at trial, that the factual issues resolved by the jury were supported by substantial evidence, and that all of the district court’s legal conclusions were correct.  The Supreme Court then issued a unanimous decision in i4i’s favor, rejecting Microsoft’s position that the appropriate standard of proof is “preponderance of the evidence” and holding instead that invalidity must be proven by “clear and convincing” evidence.

Finnegan convinced the Federal Circuit to wipe out a $45 million judgment against Ericsson.  Harris Corporation had sued Ericsson in the Northern District of Texas on a patent related to technology for correcting intersymbol interference, which can arise during use of communications equipment such as cell phones.  The Federal Circuit agreed that the district court misconstrued the claims, and erred in its calculation of the appropriate royalty rate.  The Federal Circuit also ruled against Harris on its cross-appeal, which concerned the award of enhanced damages.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit concluded that all claims of a patent relating to packaging for beverage cans are invalid, affirming a decision by the Board of Patent Appeals and Interferences of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  The patent owner had sued various beverage companies for infringement by selling beverages in Fridge Pack-style cartons.  Obtaining a stay of the litigation, Finnegan client MeadWestvaco, a carton supplier, sought inter partes reexamination of the patent and convinced the examiner, BPAI, and then the Federal Circuit of the patent's invalidity.

The Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) reversed a rejection of all patent claims in an inter partes reexamination filed against an Asetek patent related to pioneering computer cooling technology. Asetek previously asserted the patent in two separate district court litigations in the Northern District of California. Finnegan handled both cases, including one that went to a jury trial decision. Throughout the reexamination, Finnegan argued that the examiner had applied the wrong standard to interpret the claims, which resulted in an overly broad construction. The PTAB judges agreed and reversed the examiner on all issues, thus preserving the patent in full force.

After its own efforts at registering a fabric design failed, a couture fashion client came to Finnegan to handle the appeal and obtain protection for its coveted and often-infringed pattern. Our knowledge of U.S. Copyright Office appeal procedures and substantive law persuaded the Office to overturn the examiner’s decision and register the design.

In this ANDA case, our client, Elan Corporation PLC, filed suit to prevent infringement of its patent directed to naproxen formulations for once-daily oral administration. The district court held Elan’s patent claims invalid in view of Elan’s offer to license technology directed generally to the joint R&D of such pharmaceutical products. The Federal Circuit vacated the district court’s holding and remanded the case so that Elan could pursue its claims on the merits.

Jerome Lemelson had brought an infringement suit alleging that Mattel’s “Hot Wheels” toys—one of the most commercially successful toys in history—infringed one of his many patents. A jury verdict of infringement resulted in a judgment of over $70 million in damages and interest. Representing Mattel on appeal, we convinced the Federal Circuit that Mattel’s “Hot Wheels” toys did not infringe Lemelson’s patent as a matter of law. The court concluded that no reasonable jury could have found the patent claim to be both valid over the prior art and infringed, and therefore reversed the judgment against Mattel in its entirety.

Finnegan represented Zoran in two ITC investigations against MediaTek involving optical disk controller chips, acting as co-counsel with another firm. In Zoran’s affirmative case against MediaTek, the administrative law judge found in favor of Zoran after trial, and the commission ultimately entered an exclusion order against MediaTek’s infringing chips and products of many of its customers. In MediaTek’s case against Zoran, the judge exonerated Zoran’s products after a trial and found one of the two asserted patents invalid. Following issuance of the exclusion order in the first case, we also obtained a favorable ruling before the Customs Service excluding MediaTek’s supposed design-around chip. That series of victories resulted in a very favorable settlement.

A prominent restaurant chain needed a certified copy of its deposit, the chain’s logo, on a expedited basis, to file as evidence in a litigation in China. The deposit copy was lost and the client was unsuccessful in convincing the U.S. Copyright Office to remedy the problem. The restaurant chain turned to Finnegan, counting on our expertise in Office practices and our relationships with Office personnel. We persuaded the Office to accept and certify a new copy of the logo in time to meet the Chinese deadline.


Showing 1 - 10 of 243 results. View All

Sort By: Title | Date

Pages: << < 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 > >>