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Finnegan has assisted with filing and prosecuting several thousand trademark applications in the United States and abroad for Caterpillar. We obtained a preliminary injunction for Caterpillar against use of the word marks GAI, GAIERBILLART, GAIERPILLAR, GAIERPOLLAR, the yellow and black color combination for footwear and any associated packaging or labels, and/or any other trademarks, trade names, trade dress, logos, or other names or identifiers confusingly similar to the CATERPILLAR or CAT marks and/or Caterpillar’s footwear trade dress.

Finnegan defended Broadcom’s Altima subsidiary against Intel’s patent infringement allegations based on four separate patents in two different ITC actions and two different district court cases. Intel withdrew the first patent before trial when we found invalidating prior art. The second patent we proved invalid at trial, and Intel did not seek an appeal. For the third patent, we proved that 14 of 18 claims were invalid and our clients were entitled to use any pattern of solder balls other than a “bulI’s-eye” pattern. And the ITC’s decision in Intel’s favor on the fourth patent was later rejected in the district court case when the judge issued a published decision in Altima’s favor on all claim construction issues.

Jerome Lemelson had brought an infringement suit alleging that Mattel’s “Hot Wheels” toys—one of the most commercially successful toys in history—infringed one of his many patents. A jury verdict of infringement resulted in a judgment of over $70 million in damages and interest. Representing Mattel on appeal, we convinced the Federal Circuit that Mattel’s “Hot Wheels” toys did not infringe Lemelson’s patent as a matter of law. The court concluded that no reasonable jury could have found the patent claim to be both valid over the prior art and infringed, and therefore reversed the judgment against Mattel in its entirety.

In this ANDA case, our client, Elan Corporation PLC, filed suit to prevent infringement of its patent directed to naproxen formulations for once-daily oral administration. The district court held Elan’s patent claims invalid in view of Elan’s offer to license technology directed generally to the joint R&D of such pharmaceutical products. The Federal Circuit vacated the district court’s holding and remanded the case so that Elan could pursue its claims on the merits.

After its own efforts at registering a fabric design failed, a couture fashion client came to Finnegan to handle the appeal and obtain protection for its coveted and often-infringed pattern. Our knowledge of U.S. Copyright Office appeal procedures and substantive law persuaded the Office to overturn the examiner’s decision and register the design.

Finnegan represented Zoran in two ITC investigations against MediaTek involving optical disk controller chips, acting as co-counsel with another firm. In Zoran’s affirmative case against MediaTek, the administrative law judge found in favor of Zoran after trial, and the commission ultimately entered an exclusion order against MediaTek’s infringing chips and products of many of its customers. In MediaTek’s case against Zoran, the judge exonerated Zoran’s products after a trial and found one of the two asserted patents invalid. Following issuance of the exclusion order in the first case, we also obtained a favorable ruling before the Customs Service excluding MediaTek’s supposed design-around chip. That series of victories resulted in a very favorable settlement.

Finnegan client Abbott Laboratories's motion to enforce a settlement agreement with Medinol Ltd. was granted after the court adopted Abbott's interpretation of a settlement between the parties, which gave Abbott an unrestricted license to Medinol's stent patents. After a two-week jury trial on the validity of Medinol's remaining patent claims (but before the jury verdict was announced), the parties settled. When a disagreement arose over a material term during the drafting of the settlement agreement, Finnegan went back to court to enforce the agreement as the parties had stated on the record.

Finnegan won a significant victory for Guidant (now Abbott) in the U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware. After a two-week trial, the jury returned a verdict in Guidant’s favor on all counts, finding that all 12 of the asserted patent claims were valid and that all 12 of the accused Medtronic coronary stents infringed the asserted claims. The district court also held that none of the 12 accused Guidant stents infringed any of Medtronic’s four asserted patents and further dismissed Medtronic’s claims against Guidant for trade secret misappropriation and unfair competition.

A prominent restaurant chain needed a certified copy of its deposit, the chain’s logo, on a expedited basis, to file as evidence in a litigation in China. The deposit copy was lost and the client was unsuccessful in convincing the U.S. Copyright Office to remedy the problem. The restaurant chain turned to Finnegan, counting on our expertise in Office practices and our relationships with Office personnel. We persuaded the Office to accept and certify a new copy of the logo in time to meet the Chinese deadline.

Finnegan defended Korea-based client SK Innovation (SKI) in a patent infringement suit against plaintiff Celgard LLC in the Western District of North Carolina, where Celgard is located. After extensive jurisdictional discovery, the court granted SKI’s motion to dismiss for lack of personal jurisdiction and denied Celgard’s motion for preliminary injunction. Finnegan also obtained relief from the court for SKI after it was discovered that Celgard sent SKI confidential information to Celgard’s Korean counsel in unrelated Korean proceedings between the parties. The relief included prohibition of further transmission of SKI confidential information to Celgard’s Korean counsel and a bar against each of Celgard’s Korean attorneys who viewed SKI confidential information from further work on the Korean proceedings. Celgard appealed the district court’s dismissal of the case to the Federal Circuit. Finnegan represented SKI in the appeal as well. After full briefing and an oral argument, the Federal Circuit affirmed the district court’s dismissal of the case, securing SKI’s victory on the issue of personal jurisdiction.


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